Autolib’: what is the impact of the service on the use of motorcycle?

Context of the study

Most carsharing offers involve a round-trip service (the car is dropped off at the point of departure) with compulsory reservation. However, many communities are now looking at the relevance and impact of an offer that is one-way (with no obligation to return the car to the point of departure or to pay for parking) and self-service (with no obligation to reserve or specify the rental duration). Yet no study exists on the practice and impact of a one-way carsharing system with parking stations that could supply objective measurement criteria.

In this context, and following up on the first independent study conducted by 6t (in partnership with CITIZ and with financial support from the Agency for the Environment and Energy Management) into the impact of round-trip carsharing on changes in mobility behaviour, 6t decided to conduct an independent study into the impact of one-way carsharing. This new equity study by 6t has also received financial support from the ADEME.

The results have underline the effect of one-way carsharing on mobility behaviors. Thus,  signing up to Autolib’ leads to a significant decline in public transport use as shown in the table below. More specifically what is the impact of Autolib’ on the use of motorized two-wheelers ? 

 

Autolib’ brings about a decrease in the ownership of motorised two-wheelers

The survey highlights a 15 % decrease in the number of motorised two-wheelers owned by Autolib’ users. The study results also indicate a decrease in the frequency of use of motorised two-wheelers after the switch to Autolib’, which is not significant, however, due to the small numbers of owners of two-wheelers in the sample, both before and after the switch to Autolib’.[1] To obtain meaningful results, we created the following categories:

  • the “decrease” category includes respondents who gave up all motorised two-wheelers in their household after signing up to Autolib’, as well as respondents who still own one or more, but who have used a motorised two-wheeler less since they signed up;
  • the “no change” category includes respondents who owned one or more motorised two-wheelers before signing up to Autolib’, who still own them and who have used them the same amount since signing up;
  • the “increase” category includes respondents who did not own a motorised two-wheeler before signing up to Autolib’ and who now have one or more in their household, as well as respondents who already owned one prior to signing up and who have used it more since then. However, this category includes only five respondents and was therefore not taken into account in our analyses.

Respondents who used a motorised two-wheeler less after they signed up to Autolib’ are customers who use the service very often: 20 % use it every day or almost, 51 % use it two to three times a week, compared with 5 % and 32 % respectively for customers who use motorised two-wheelers as much as before. We can therefore assume that there is a replacement effect between Autolib’ and motorised two-wheelers.

Figure 1: Frequency of use of the Autolib’ service according to changes in the use of motorised two-wheelers

graph1Source: 6t-Bureau de Recherche, 2014, 100 respondents who have or had one or more motorised two-wheelers in their household

 

However, customers who use motorised two-wheelers less also tend to give up their cars: the percentage of users without a car rises from 34 % to 59 % after they sign up to Autolib’. Among customers whose use of motorised two-wheelers does not change, the increase in the percentage of users in households without a car is much lower, increasing from 48 % to 54 %. The replacement of motorised two-wheelers by Autolib’ thus seems part of a broader trend to give up individual motorised vehicles.

 

Figure 2: Number of cars in the respondents’ households (in columns) before (first graph) and after (second graph) signing up to Autolib’, according to changes in the use of motorised two-wheelers (in rows)

graph2

graph3

Source: 6t-Bureau de Recherche, 2014, 100 respondents who have or had one or more motorised two-wheelers in their household

 

Respondents who use motorised two-wheelers less after signing up to Autolib’ also tend to use the service more often for commuting than customers whose use of motorised two-wheeler does not change. This does not hold true concerning the other reasons why customers use Autolib’. So it may be that motorised two-wheelers are replaced by Autolib’ above all for commuting.

Motorised two-wheelers seem to be replaced by Autolib’ above all for commuting

 

Figure 3: Frequency of use of the Autolib’ service for commuting (in columns), according to changes in the use of motorised two-wheelers (in rows)

graph4

Source: 6t-Bureau de Recherche, 2014, 100 respondents who have or had one or more motorised two-wheelers in their household

 

Finally, respondents who have used motorised two-wheelers less since signing up to Autolib’ and who work or study tend to study or work more in Paris (89 %) than customers whose use of motorised two-wheelers does not change (57%). One possible explanation is that, like the two-wheeler, Autolib’ is a solution to the parking problems faced by owners of private cars in Paris, while offering users the comfort of a car (including an enclosed passenger space).

 

Figure 4: Change in the use of motorised two-wheelers based on location of place of work or study

graph5

Source: 6t-Bureau de Recherche, 2014, 100 respondents who have or had one or more motorised two-wheelers in their household

 

The Autolib’ service seems to be a substitute for motorised two-wheelers for some users: this may be explained by the flexibility offered by a one-way service that meets the need for flexibility for users of motorised two-wheelers, particularly with the opportunity to travel “door to door” without the constraints imposed by a private car.

 

Significant results, to be completed and updated …

This study has produced original data concerning the users, uses and effects of one-way carsharing. However, the practice of carsharing may take some time to produce all its effects on user mobility, as users gain experience of the service and therefore skills in using it. Among carsharing services analysed in the context of our investigation, Autolib’ is the most recent (2 years), which is why 6t has set up a monitoring panel that will be surveyed in fall 2014 to analyse the changes in mobility behaviour as a result of one-way carsharing.

 

To download the full report

 


 

[1] Only owners of motorised two-wheelers in the period concerned were asked questions about their frequency of use of motorised two-wheelers. For example, only respondents who reported owning one or more motorised two-wheelers in the household prior to signing up to Autolib’ were asked about the frequency of use of motorised two-wheelers before signing up to Autolib’.

A project sheet is available

Share this publication :